Haystack Rock Tidepools part of National Wildlife Refuge

 

Exploring the tide pools around nearby Haystack Rock is an inviting summer activity for guests of Tolovana Inn at Cannon Beach.

 An iconic natural landmark, Haystack Rock is actually designated a protected Marine Gardesb10068250tt-001n and National Wildlife Refuge.  And, the Haystack Rock Awareness Program (HRAP) provides both staff and volunteers daily throughout the summer to guide beachcombers and answer questions about the natural world.

HRPA is actually a stewardship and environmental education program whose mission is to protect Haystack Rock, and the intertidal and bird ecology surround it.   Each day, members set up an extensive interpretive program including signs and educational brochures, bird stations with spotting scopes and often times, microscopes too.

To be a good s6889142046_alternateteward, visitors are reminded that the intertidal areas around Haystack Rock are fragile ecosystems.  Guests are encouraged to tread lightly around the tide pools and stay on sand or small bare rock to avoid stepping on vulnerable animals like anemones and barnacles.    Be gentle as you observe wildlife in its natural state, being sure to leave the natural environment undisturbed.

Since its inception im1985, the HRPA has educated hundreds of thousand adults and children about this amazing island and the marine-related life around it, protecting it each day, and for generations to come.

gvwebcam_020709_3

Look Up! Blue Angels Flying Cannon Beach Today

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

US Navy Blue Angels Flight Squadron

On their way to the Oregon International Air Show this weekend, the U.S. Navy Blue Angels flight squadron will be flying over Cannon Beach this afternoon.

The six jet F/A-18 Delta Formation will fly twice around Mt. St. Helen’s before heading west.  They will fly along the shoreline near Ecola State Park in Cannon Beach for a flyover and photo shoot. A seventh jet, flying alongside the demo team will serve as the photo platform.  Expect to see or hear something between 5:00 and 6:00 p.m. today.

The Blue Angels are scheduled to land at the Hillsboro Airport where they are scheduled to perform this weekend.

ecola

Ecola State Park, in Cannon Beach

 

 

 

Tolovana Inn site of kick-off and garden party wrap-up of annual Cannon Beach Cottage & Garden Tour

On of the notable homes in Cannon Beach is the former summer residence of past Gov. Oswald West.

On of the notable homes in Cannon Beach is the former summer residence of past Gov. Oswald West.

Tickets for the September 12-13 Cannon Beach Cottage & Garden Tour are now available for purchase.

The two day event, now in its 12th year, is a major fundraiser for the Cannon Beach History Center & Museum, and provides participants an opportunity to visit unique coastal homes and private art collections.

The tour will begin Saturday, Sept. 12, at noon, at the Tolovana Inn, with a luncheon prepared by Culinary Capers, followed by a round-table discussion moderated by CBHCM board president, Kimberley Speer-Miller, who will provide the unique history of Cannon Beach.   Equipped with a new perspective, attendees will start the self-guided tour.

The Saturday tour begins at 1:00 pm and will conclude with a fun reception at the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum including wine, live music and appetizers and a raffle.

On Sunday, Tolovana Inn will be the site of a wrap-up event, an English-style, Garden Tea Party.  Guests will enjoy Oregon-made teas, homemade scones and treats in a flower-filled setting.   The event will be highlighted by a presentations from Debbie Teashon, owner of the Rainy Side Gardener and writer.   Her topic will be “Life Beyond the Two-Season Garden.   She is the co-author of Gardening for the Home Brewer: Plants for Making Beer, Wine, Gruit, Cider, Perry, and More.

Tickets for each event are available to purchase separately. Luncheon and lecture tickets are $25; Cottage & Garden Tour tickets are $30, and Garden Tea tickets, $20.  A weekend event package is $60. All tickets can be purchased on line throught the museum.  (www.cbhistory.org) or by phone at 503-436-9301.

Cannon Beach to Manzanita: Otherworldly Auto Tour

Excerpted from Beach Connection.net

Owald State Park viewpoint, just south of Cannon Beach.

Owald State Park viewpoint, just south of Cannon Beach.

Few auto tours along the coastline are quite as engaging as that run between Manzanita and Cannon Beach.  It’s about 15 miles and about a dozen winding bends that enter a lush, forest canopy, only to reemerge along more stunning ocean viewpoints.

The curves begin just south of Cannon Beach, twisting along as you drive past pullouts and spots like Hug Point, Arcadia Beach and Arch Cape that never cease to amaze. Soon, you’ll enter the Arch Cape tunnel, which opens up to a brief glimpse of panoramic ocean views, before entering the forests of Oswald State Park. Here, check out the surfing Mecca of Short Sands Beach, some wondrous trails, primitive campsites and a couple of hidden beaches tucked along the road as well.

Short Sands surf beach

Short Sands surf beach, between Cannon Beach and Manzanita.

These viewpoints just south of Cannon Beach are some of the most famous on the entire Oregon coast.  The final attractions here are the Neahkahnie Overlooks just above Manzanita – one of the most popular viewpoints along Oregon’s coastline.

 

Coastal Sunsets at Cannon Beach a Spectacular Display of Color

Glorious Oregon coastal sunset, (George Vetter Photography)

Glorious Oregon coastal sunset, (George Vetter Photography)

As the days get longer, rooms with a view at Tolovana Inn are even more desirable.

That’s because Mother Nature’s gorgeous coastal sunsets are a beauty to behold and almost impossible to describe.

When the sun drops toward the Pacific Ocean horizon, the backdrops of color are breathtaking.  A maritime layer can turn the sun into a glowing ball of orange and the landscape a sky of golden light.   The evening sky can reveal a color palette from pink, purple and blues to orange, yellow and red.

Spring and early summer nights frequently offer a show stopping display of nature’s glory that must be experienced at least once in a lifetime, and fortunately for most Oregonians, much more than that.

Daylight lasts over 14 hours now, with sunset approaching 8:34pm.

With ocean front and ocean view rooms, Tolovana Inn provides front row viewing for magical nights on the coast, one of many highlights of any trip to Cannon Beach.

Call today to reserve your  stay in one of the  spacious, ocean front or ocean view room at the Tolovana Inn, in Cannon Beach.

 

 

Cannon Beach Yoga Festival, March 6-8

Yoga-Canon-Beach-Sarahjoy-2015

Yoga: World Class Instructors; World Class Location

If you are a regular practitioner of yoga, or have thought you might like to learn more about it, there is no better way to immerse yourself into this stress-reducing and healthful activity that at the Cannon Beach Yoga Festival,  March 6-8.

The festival draws yogis and students from around the region and beyond for a weekend full of workshops, lectures, discussion and meditation.  Come with an open mind and you are sure to be inspired by the experience–and by the stunning beauty of Cannon Beach.

Events are held at various locations around town, including the Tolovana Inn.  A full festival pass includes opening and closing ceremonies, ten hours of workshops and shuttles between locations.  You can also purchase a one-day pass, or a partial festival pass, providing access into individual workshops, as space allows.

Learn more about this uniquely relaxing event and register online at Cannon Beach Yoga Festival.   When you book accommodations at the Tolovana Inn, be sure to ask about special festival rates.

 

 

Meet a Roosevelt Elk

Cow_elk_near_haystack_rock,_Cannon_Beach,_OR -859c0937c4b850e6

 

 (Photo: JoAnna Dotson, 1-2-2015) 

During the quieter, winter season at the Oregon Coast, keep your eyes peeled around dusk and dawn.  That’s when you are mostly likely to see a majestic Roosevelt elk emerge from the shadows of the forest to graze in open meadows or wander along the edge of Cannon Beach looking for a bite to eat.

Elk are nocturnal herbivores that munch on ferns, shrubs, lichen, various berries, and grasses.  They also feed on seedlings of Douglas firs and western cedar.  With the abundance of food and cover, along with mild winters, the elk rarely migrate, spending most of the lives in the same area.

Or, you might even be surprised like a young woman who recently spotted an entire heard of elk swimming near the Astoria Bridge.

According to a spokesman with  the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, it’s not unusual for elk or deer to swim in rivers if they are motivated to find another place to graze or if they are seeking protection from predators—primarily humans or cougars.

Roosevelt Elk are found between in the Cascades from British Columbia to Northern California, and especially in the Oregon Coast range.   Named by Theodore Roosevelt, the desire to protect North America’s large, coastal dwelling elk was one of the primary forces behind the establishment of Washington’s Olympic National Park in 1909.

Elk are matriarchal.  Herds are generally led by females, comprised of calves, and adolescent bulls and cows.  Males live separately, except during the late-August breeding resulting in calves born the following spring.   Males weigh between 700 and 1,100 and cows about 625.

 Astoria resident JoAnna Dotson spotted this herd of elk swimming near in the Columbia River on January 2, 2015. (Copied from OregonLive.com.  See more photos and read more at this link.  http://www.oregonlive.com/multimedia/index.ssf/2015/01/post_39.html 

Whale Watching on the Oregon Coast for the New Year

medium_2294778221

Oregon’s Whale of a Tradition

An excerpt from a column written by David Sarasohn, in
The Oregonian, 12/28/2014.

There are places, of course, where the holiday animal traditions run to reindeer, and others featuring cuddly bears.

Around here, we think bigger.

This weekend marks the beginning of whale watching week on the Oregon coast, which annually takes place right after Christmas, as though the whales were trying to get to a New Year’s Eve party in California. Over several months, about 20,000 gray whales, and maybe some cetacean fellow travelers, journey from Alaska to Mexico. This week, Oregonians will trek out to the coast to catch a glimpse from the shore or get a closer look from a bobbing boat.

The goal is to pick out a gray whale in a gray sea, or a spout of water in an endless ocean, and catch sight of a parade that’s been going on longer than anything with floats or marching bands. For the whale, it’s a several weeks nonstop cruise.

“It’s an opportunity to see an animal the size of a school bus,” says William Hanshumaker, Oregon Sea Grant chief scientist at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. “It’s hard not to be impressed by seeing something that large.”

Gray whales, like a lot of other legends prominent around this time, are a renewal story. “These animals are back from the brink of extinction,” says Sobel. “Thirty or forty years ago, they were nearly extinct. They were protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act in 1972…before that, crucially, the Mexican government protected the whales in their winter quarters. In 1995, the gray whale came off the endangered list.

Now, thousands of them annually swim by the Oregon coast, keeping close to shore, although probably not consciously posing for pictures. Heading south at the end and the very beginning of the year, with a heavy layer of blubber that keeps them from stopping too often to feed, they’re swimming in mixed groups, on the way to give birth in warmer waters. On the way back north in spring, the males go first, with the females working to keep the new calves between themselves and the shore.

Oregonians tend to venture outside through various climatic conditions.  And they feel, it seems, a special pull from a prehistoric creature proceeding placidly down one of the world’s longest maritime migration routes, coming back from the threat of extinction to claim their (very large) place in the world.

Especially for a place that likes to think of itself as deeply connected to the natural space around it, whale watching seems a particularly fitting “New Year.”  With wobbly stomach and constant uncertainty, you scan an endless horizon trying to catch a sudden glimpse of something wondrous, something bigger than yourself.

 

(Bring binoculars and check into an ocean-front suite at Tolovana Inn for winter whale watching!)

 

 

Storm Watching: When Mother Nature Puts on the Show

cb_cloudburst - Copy

Winter is the perfect time of year to enjoy the natural and powerful drama of the Pacific Coast, when stormy, wet days can be followed up with soothing cool, breaks of blue sky and sunshine.

There are a couple of ways to enjoy winter storm watching in Cannon Beach.

The most comfortable is cuddled up inside an ocean front suite at the Tolovana Inn, snug near a fireplace with your favorite beverage, watching the stormy skies and thundering waves crash against the shore and nearby Haystack Rock.

Or if you prefer, bundle up and get outdoors for some real action.  Rain gear and boots are recommended.    Sure, your hair may get whipped around, and it may be hard to know which way the rain is falling, but that’s part of the excitement.

Walking along the shore to experience an upfront view of the ocean’s magnificent power is invigorating.   But, be sure to stay alert.  Just five inches of water can move a five ton log.  And sneaker waves that join up up can quickly double their height.

Depending upon where you are, avoid climbing on cliffs and jetties. Large rocks are slippery.  And, they can shift.

But drying off and warming up after a brisk  storm walk is part of the experience.  And, a bowl of clam chowder from Mo’s Restaurant, next door to Tolovana Inn, is both welcome and restorative.

The day after a storm is the best time for beach combing.  That’s when the ocean’s flotsam and jetsam are washed ashore and treasure hunting is at its best.   You can find anything from amazing shells to some random cargo that might have fallen off an ocean barge.

You can enjoy the calm—again–before the next storm.

 

1 2 3